Mark S. Demet, of Racine, pleaded guilty to two counts of election fraud after admitting to forging at least seven names on petitions to recall State Senator Van Wanggaard in 2011 and 2012. Prosecutors dropped seven charges of identity fraud in exchange for the plea, and prosecutors in nearby Kenosha County agreed not to charge Demet for similar election offenses committed there. Demet claimed he was driven by extreme animus towards Republicans that led him to allow his emotions to “run wild” in the “toxic political environment in the state of Wisconsin.” Demet was sentenced to pay $2,500 in fines. Wisconsin. 2013. Ballot Petition Fraud. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Jenny Wanasek was the petition circulator for the recall of Governor Scott Walker who deliberately looked away so that Caitlin B. Haycock could sign her parents’ names on the petition. Wanasek pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge for failing to cross out the parents’ names before turning in the petition. Wanasek was sentenced to 40 hours of community service and was fined $500 as conditions of probation. Wisconsin. 2013. Ballot Petition Fraud. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Chad Gigowski pleaded guilty to double voting in the 2012 election. Gigowski used an old driver’s license to vote in Greenfield on election day, before showing up later in Milwaukee with a Department of Workforce Development letter as proof of his Milwaukee residence. He was sentenced to six months in jail with work release privileges and 2.5 years of probation. Wisconsin. 2013. Duplicate Voting. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Caitlin B. Haycock pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor election fraud charge for signing both of her parents’ names to a 2011 petition seeking a recall election for Governor Scott Walker. Compounding the issue, Haycock told the petition circulator, Jenny Wanasek, what she was doing. Wanasek deliberately (and literally) looked the other way so Haycock could commit the fraud. Wanasek later pleaded guilty to charges stemming from the incident. As for Haycock, she was sentenced to 40 hours of community service and was fined $500 as conditions of probation. Wisconsin. 2013. Ballot Petition Fraud. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Brittany M. Rainey pleaded guilty to voting as a felon in the 2012 general election. She had been convicted on a charge of felony child neglect in 2010 but lied about her conviction in order to cast a vote. She was sentenced to 45 days in the Milwaukee County House of Correction. Wisconsin. 2013. Ineligible Voting. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Jennifer Derrebery, of Bassett, pleaded guilty to felony counts of election fraud and perjury after she produced hundreds of fraudulent signatures on a petition to get Newt Gingrich on the ballot for the Republican presidential nomination. She received a 10-year suspended sentence and five years’ probation, and she was required to pay $1,266 in court costs. Virginia. 2013. Ballot Petition Fraud. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Adam Ward, an employee of the Gingrich presidential campaign, pleaded guilty to 36 counts of voter fraud, as well as perjury after admitting that he forged signatures during the drive to get Gingrich on the Virginia primary ballot. Out of 11,000 signatures collected by Ward, 4,000 could not be confirmed. Virginia. 2013. Ballot Petition Fraud. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Magdalena Robledo Rodriguez pleaded guilty to illegal voting for falsely listing an address during the 2010 election in Alton. Rodriguez changed her registration to an address belonging to Jose Picasso, one of the candidates in the Alton mayoral election. Rodriguez was sentenced to deferred adjudication and was ordered to pay a $250 fine. Texas. 2013. False Registrations. Diversion Program. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Fermina Castillo pleaded guilty to one count of illegal felon voting in the 2010 general election. She was sentenced to two years of deferred adjudication and community supervision and was ordered to pay a $100 fine. Texas. 2013. Ineligible Voting. Diversion Program. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Sonia Solis pleaded guilty to voting five times under five different names in the 2012 primary runoff election. She committed her fraud using absentee ballots. She was sentenced to six months of home confinement and five years’ probation. Texas. 2013. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Martha Estella Rodriguez, of Mission, pleaded guilty to voting in the 2010 election in nearby Alton, despite not living in that city. According to officials, Rodriguez changed her registration to an address belonging to Jose Picasso, one of the candidates in the Alton mayoral election. Records indicated that at least 23 others did the same prior to voting. Rodriguez was sentenced to serve one day in jail, two years of community supervision, and was ordered to pay a $500 fine. Texas. 2013. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Margarita Rangel Ozuna pleaded no contest to illegally assisting Ricardo Liceaga Alonso in voting in 2010. She prepared his ballot without his direction, and then deposited his carrier envelope without providing the proper information on the envelope. Ozuna received a sentence of probation. Texas. 2013. Illegal “Assistance” at the Polls. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Lorenzo Antonio Almanza, of Progreso, was convicted of voting twice in Progreso’s 2009 school board election, once in his own name and once using his incarcerated brother’s name. Almanza was sentenced to two years’ imprisonment and five years of probation. Texas. 2013. Duplicate Voting. Impersonation Fraud at the Polls. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
James Alan Jenkins was convicted of illegal voting after he made a false statement on a voter registration application. Specifically, Jenkins designated a Residence Inn as his address so that he, and a group of other individuals, could vote in an election in a district in which he did not live to try to take control of a local utility board. While the trial court initially sentenced Jenkins to 3 years in prison and a $10,000 fine, the Court of Appeals overturned that conviction and remanded the case for retrial. At the retrial, Jenkins pleaded no contest to falsifying data on a registration application and was sentence to 12 months’ probation and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. Texas. 2013. Ineligible Voting. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary