When his wife was running for the House of Delegates, Mark Oliver Hrutkay, a lawyer and his wife’s campaign treasurer, paid $10,000 to a political operative to secure support for his wife’s candidacy. He pleaded guilty to mail fraud charges, stemming from his mailing a campaign disclosure form that failed to mention the $10,000 payment. He was sentenced to one year in prison and ordered to pay fines amounting to $45,000. West Virginia. 2005. Buying Votes. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Johnny “Big John” Mendez, former Logan County Sheriff, pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy to buy votes. Mendez bought votes for himself and a member of the state House of Delegates, making cash payments and offering more money to heads of households who could deliver the votes of all the eligible voters living at a given residence. He was sentenced to a year of home confinement and five years of probation. West Virginia. 2005. Buying Votes. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Doris McFarland’s husband passed away before he could vote in the 2004 election, and Mrs. McFarland decided to cast his absentee ballot. She later admitted to double voting in that year’s election but avoided jail time. She was ordered to pay court fees and a $490 fine. Washington. 2005. Fraudulent Use of Abs. Ballots. Diversion Program. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Melva Kay Ponce was convicted for mailing in an absentee ballot for her deceased mother in the November 2004 general election. She pleaded guilty to one charge of illegal voter registration and was sentenced to two years of deferred adjudication and ordered to pay a $1,500 fine. Texas. 2005. Fraudulent Use of Abs. Ballots. Diversion Program. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Johnny Wayne Akers, of Hardeman County, was charged with six counts of “possession of an official ballot or carrier envelope of another” for engaging in vote harvesting activities during a 2004 primary election in Texas. He pleaded guilty to possession of an official ballot, and was sentenced to two years of probation and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. Texas. 2005. Fraudulent Use of Abs. Ballots. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Mary Lou Simpson of Manchester was arrested after the 2004 election for attempting to vote in the name of her deceased sister. Ms. Simpson was spotted by a poll worker who recognized that she had already voted earlier in the day. The facts have been confirmed by the district attorney’s office which prosecuted the case. The then 63-year-old woman was convicted of a Class E felony which is punishable by up to two years in prison. Tennessee. 2005. Impersonation Fraud at the Polls. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Howard Allen pleaded guilty to one count of “False Entries” and was sentenced to two years of probation. During his probation, Allen was barred from participating in election activities without the permission of the court. Tennessee. 2005. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Jorge Jesus Hosier was convicted on three counts of making a false statement, and one count of forgery, in relation to an election. Hosier voted despite being ineligible. Hosier was sentenced according to Oregon sentencing guidelines and ordered to pay $1,854 in fines and court costs. Oregon. 2005. Ineligible Voting. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Chad Staton pleaded guilty to 10 felony counts for filing false voter registrations in exchange for crack cocaine. Staton allegedly filled out more than 100 forms with names such as Mary Poppins, Michael Jackson, Michael Jordan, Dick Tracy, and George Lopez prior to the 2004 presidential election. He then handed them over to Georgianne Pitts, who worked on behalf of the NAACP National Voter Fund, who turned in the form to the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections. Staton was sentenced to nine months’ imprisonment each for six counts of the fifth-degree felony, to be served consecutively, according to court personnel. Ohio. 2005. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Operation Big Vote, an effort to register black voters, led to a scheme to register prominent dead local politicians to vote. Nonaresa Montgomery, an Operation Big Vote employee, was convicted of perjury for lying to a grand jury investigating thousands of fraudulent voter registration cards turned in before the 2001 mayoral primary. Six others pleaded guilty to dozens of election law violations in connection with the scheme. Montgomery received two years of probation. Missouri. 2005. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Former St. Martinville City Council member Pamela Thibodeaux pleaded guilty to falsifying information on voter registration forms to allow people outside the district to vote for her in the 2002 city election. She was sentenced to three years’ probation, eight months’ home confinement, and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine and $1,500 in restitution. Louisiana. 2005. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Leslie McIntosh, James Scherzer, and Lorraine Goodrich were convicted of voting in both Kansas and Missouri and providing false residency information to election officials. Scherzer was sentenced to two years’ probation and 40 hours of community service; McIntosh was fined $500; and Goodrich was sentenced to one year of probation. Kansas. 2005. Duplicate Voting. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary
Following a trial, Illinois State Representative Patricia Bailey was found guilty of filing false election forms claiming her residency in the 6th District, when she was actually living with her mother outside of the district. Bailey was charged with two counts of perjury and one count of falsifying election documents. She was sentenced two years’ probation and 100 hours of community service. She was barred from holding a government job for five years upon completion of her sentence. Illinois. 2005. False Registrations. Criminal Conviction. Fraud Investigation. Report Summary